Tuesday, August 18, 2009

Boot and Run Ubuntu from a USB Drive | Hack N Mod

Boot and Run Ubuntu from a USB Drive

We’ve shown you how to run XP from a USB drive, and now it’s Ubuntu’s turn. Learn step by step how to prep your drive for Ubuntu. Running an OS from a flash drive can be useful sometimes, you can even recover data from a damaged hard drive.

This tutorial will show you how to install, boot, and run the popular Linux OS, Ubuntu from your flash drive. You will be able to automatically save your changes and settings back to the flash drive and restore them on each boot using a second partition.

You can run Ubuntu with all your settings and files, even if you don’t have your own computer with you. You will have a whole, powerful operating system in your pocket!

Full article here: Boot and Run Ubuntu from a USB Drive | Hack N Mod

Monday, August 17, 2009

Sugar on a Stick - Sugar Labs


Sugar Labs offers ubiquitous access to Sugar in a USB (Universal Serial Bus) flash memory drive (stick). The Sugar on a Stick project gives children access to their Sugar on any computer in their environment with just a USB memory stick. Taking advantage of the Fedora LiveUSB, it's possible to store everything you need to run Sugar on a single USB memory stick (minimum size 1GB). This small USB device can boot into the Sugar learning platform on different computers at home, at school, or at an after-school program, bypassing the software on the those computers. In fact, Sugar on a Stick will work even if the computer does not have a hard-drive. With Sugar on a Stick, the learning experience is the same on any computer: at school, at home, at the library, or an after-school center. SugarLabs3x.jpg

What's exactly on the Stick: The Fedora version contains a compressed copy of Fedora 11 that will boot, run in memory, and maintain changes on a USB flash drive with a standard FAT16 or FAT32 partition. The files coexist with other files the user may have or put on the disk. Different types of configurations are being designed to offer the options to run virtualizations or emulations and to use virtual machines on existing computers, saving the Sugar Home folder (the learner's work) on the Stick for use at another workstation. See our resources page for more information.
For general questions, please see the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) page for Sugar on a Stick.
You can learn more from Walter Bender's interview with Xconomy, Wayan Vota's video and Mike Lee's pictures.

Sugar on a Stick - Sugar Labs

Wednesday, August 12, 2009

My Ubuntu Tips

by Alan Zisman (c) 2006, 2009

I'm not a Linux guru, just someone who's pretty comfortable working with Windows and Mac OS X systems who wanted to see to how well I could get Ubuntu Linux up and running as a replacement for those systems. There are some nice things about Linux and about Ubuntu in particular that make it a potentially appealing choice:

  • Linux doesn't suffer from the plague of Internet-borne viruses, spyware, and vulnerabilities to hackers that plague Windows systems
  • Unlike the (equally secure) Mac OS X, Linux can be installed onto the hardware that most people already have-- standard PCs. Many Linux-capable computers can be purchased cheaply or even obtained for free. For instance, I'm running Ubuntu Linux on a 2001-era HP Omnibook notebook... this Pentium III-800 MHz system cost US$4100 when new; I bought it recently for CDN$250. With 512 MB RAM and a 20 GB hard drive, it runs Ubuntu quite nicely.
  • Ubuntu is free and comes with a range of equally free applications such as the OpenOffice.org office suite, The Gimp photo editor, and more. Lots of other free applications and utilities are available for free installation.
However, there are some things about Linux and about Ubuntu in particular that are less appealing to people like me:

  • There are a large number of Linux distributions. While on the one hand, that means there are specialized packages for users with different needs (for instance free distributions vs paid distributions for people or organizations more comfortable with a formal support structure), it can be confusing. Moreover, some applications require different versions for different distributions, or are more easily installed in some distributions than others.
  • Similarly, there are a multiplicity of potential interfaces; two major desktop interfaces: Gnome (used in the standard Ubuntu package) and KDE (used in the Kubuntu varient) and lots of others. This too is both a good thing and a source of confusion. I chose the standard (Gnome-based) Ubuntu, in part simply because I like the way it looks compared to KDE.
  • There may be no Linux drivers for some hardware peripherals, or driver-installation may only be possible with more fussing than many users are comfortable with. When drivers do exist, they may be lacking some of the features of the commercial drivers for Windows or Mac OS X. While Ubuntu's scanner utility recognized the scanner in my HP PSC950 all-in-one, I couldn't actually get it to scan, for instance.
  • There's a down-side to Ubuntu's being free and open source. For licensing reasons, it doesn't include software that isn't also free and open source (under the Gnu Public License- GPL). So free software such as Real Player or Adobe Acrobat isn't included. Even though there are Linux versions of these programs, they aren't open source and licensed under the GPL. Users have to download and install them on their own. Out of the box, Ubuntu is somewhat multi-media challenged- though it's getting better!
Full list here: My Ubuntu Tips

Linux.com :: Ten tips for new Ubuntu users

Ubuntu has become the most popular Linux distribution for new Linux users. It's easy to install, easy to use, and usually "just works." But moving to a different operating system can be confusing, no matter how well-designed it is. Here's a list of tips that might save you some time while you're getting used to Ubuntu.

1. Getting multimedia to work

The default Ubuntu install contains free software only, which means that it doesn't support some popular multimedia formats straight out of the box. This is inconvenient, but the Ubuntu folks have good reasons for not shipping with support for MP3, DVDs, and so forth -- including that software could cause them some legal headaches, or incur some serious fees.

Fortunately, as a user, you don't need to worry about fees (though some of the packages may not be legal due to patent restrictions or restrictions on circumventing copy protection, depending on where you live). The Ubuntu wiki has a page on restricted formats that explains how to get the packages you need. However, if you run Ubuntu on AMD64 or PowerPC hardware, you'll still be out in the cold for some of the packages, since some multimedia formats depend on proprietary software that's not available for those hardware platforms.

More here: Linux.com :: Ten tips for new Ubuntu users

Tuesday, August 11, 2009

17 Essential Linux Resources That You Shouldn’t Miss | A New Morning

Linux is one of our favorite topics, have covered some nifty topics on linux in the past. Today, we are covering a Wide Collection of Linux Apps which include Image Viewers, Video Editors, News Aggregators, Backup Tools & Guides etc. Credit goes to all the people who have put maximum effort to gather these various application in their own specific categories. You may also want to check out our “Linux” Category for more awesome stuff.

17 Essential Linux Resources That You Shouldn’t Miss | A New Morning

Sunday, August 09, 2009

How to gracefully reboot your Ubuntu/Debian system if all else fails | ArsGeek

There you are, staring at a crashed Gnome session, CTRL-ALT-BKSPC does nothing. ALT-CTRL-F1 won’t bring you to a terminal where you could cd to /etc/init.d and restart gdm. In short, your choices seem to be limited to holding down the power button and chancing file system corruption or nothing.

But wait! There’s two more options that you may not have known about!


Here are two ways to first try and kill just the process on your current terminal (thus allowing you to get back into your machine and at least attempt a ’shutdown -h now’ command) and if that fails, to bring your machine down in a more graceful manner than a hard shutdown.

First, we’ll try and kill all the process on your current terminal. To do this, hold down the following keys -

ALT + SysReq + k

What the heck is a SysReq key? Look for it on your PrtSc or Print Screen key. The k in this instance stands for Kill.

If that doesn’t work for you, it’s time to take drastic action. You’ll now enter a series of keystrokes that will tell your computer to do some housekeeping before shutting down.

ALT + SysReq + r

This stands for Raw keyboard mode.

ALT + SysReq + s

This syncs the disk.

ALT + SysReq + e

This terminates all processes

ALT + SysReq + i

Kill’s all processes that weren’t terminated nicely.

ALT + SysReq + u

Remounts all filesystems as read only.

ALT + SysReq + b

Reboots.

That’s a heck of a lot better than simply holding down the power button and hoping everything works out okay.

How will you ever remember all those keystrokes? There is a long held mnemonic that makes it a bit easier:

Raising Skinny Elephants Is Utterly Boring - RSEIUB

You should use this method only if other methods (mentioned above) fail.


How to gracefully reboot your Ubuntu/Debian system if all else fails | ArsGeek

Thursday, August 06, 2009

5 Excellent Downloadable eBooks To Teach Yourself Linux

So you have heard of all the advantages and geeky babble about how Linux is better and you have finally decided to try it? Just one thing, you don’t know an awful lot about Linux to get you started. How about some free downloadable ebooks to teach yourself Linux, that you can download today? Would that help?linux-penguin

Free – you ask? Yes, free. Welcome to the world of Linux where things are free both as in free speech and also as in free beer (mostly)!

If you are starting out on your journey towards Linux awesomeness, here are a few free downloadable ebooks to teach yourself Linux that should help you along nicely:


5 Excellent Downloadable eBooks To Teach Yourself Linux

Wednesday, August 05, 2009

Easy Way To Install Ubuntu Linux On USB Drive

Ubuntu is one of most active group behind modifying linux and making it easy for windows users to accept and try ubuntu linux with more user acceptability.

Out of the all those Ubuntu community has taken the initiative of proving desktop edition of ubuntu linux which can be easily installed and uninstalled from windows itself. The only thing that was quite difficult till now was to install ubuntu linux on a USB portable drive.

But now with uSbuntu Live Creator which is the safest and easiest way to install ubuntu linux on your USB portable drive which enables you to install and run ubuntu directly from your USB drive.

ubuntu-live-creator
You can install ubuntu on USB drive either from a ubuntu iso image you have, or from a ubuntu installation cd and you don’t have them then you need download the iso image of ubuntu from here.



I would recommend a USB drive of at least 2 GB capacity to install ubuntu linux, uSbuntu live creator will take some amount of time to install ubuntu, but the booting time will depend on the size and speed of your USB drive.

Easy Way To Install Ubuntu Linux On USB Drive